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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
CNN
Aug 25, 2013 10:00am PDT
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
CNN
Aug 18, 2013 7:00am PDT
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
CNN
Aug 4, 2013 7:00am PDT
at where america lost its way could use this town as a primary source. go to cnn.com/fareed for a link to my "washington post" column this week, and let's get started. >>> when the rungs on the ladder of opportunity grow farther and farther apart, it undermines the very essence of america. that idea that if you work hard, you can make it here. >> that was president obama last week. in fact one thing that both right and left agree on is that social and economic mobility, bowing able to make it no matter where you start from, is at the heart of the american dream. in recent years the most depressing statistics about this country have been that that mobility has declined, particularly compared with other countries, despite the anecdotes and celebrated examples, most americans appear to be stuck in the economic strata into which they were born. last week the most detailed study on this topic was released. it provides lots of fascinating clo clues about the causes of our problem, breaking american mobility down by geography. for example, if you were born in a detroit family in the bottom fi
CNN
Aug 11, 2013 10:00am PDT
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)